Do you know?

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There are approximately 2.2 million people in prison in the United States - the highest prison population in the world. 1Institute for Criminal Policy Research
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The prison population in the United States has increased 700% since 1970. 2Pew Trusts
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The United States represents 5% of the world’s population and 25% of the world’s PRISON population. 3The New York Times
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At least 95% of inmates will eventually be released from prison. 4U.S. Department of Justice: Bureau of Justice Statistics
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Black men are incarcerated 6 times more often than white men. 5Pew Research Center
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One out of every four black males born today will end up in jail if current incarceration rates continue. 6The Washington Post
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The state of California houses more than 130,000 inmates across 35 prisons. 7California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation
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In 2017 alone, California taxpayers will pay $11.4 BILLION dollars to oversee 129,000 inmates and 44,000 parolees. 8CA State Budget: Public Safety, National Association of State Budget Officers
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As of 2017, the cost to the California taxpayer is $75,560 a year for each inmate – more than the cost of tuition at Harvard for a year. 9Los Angeles Times
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The recidivism rate in California hovers around 45%. 10Inside CDCR

Do you know?

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A 2011 study of the formerly incarcerated found that employment was the single most important factor in decreasing recidivism. 11Mark T. Berg and Beth M. Huebner, “Reentry and the Ties that Bind: An Examination of Social Ties, Employment, and Recidivism, Justice Quarterly (28), 2011: 382-410.
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Recidivism rates were nearly cut in half for former inmates who have full-time jobs compared with those who are unemployed. 12Jake Cronin, Institute of Public Policy, Truman School of Public Affairs, University of Missouri
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Statewide rates of recidivism range from about 31% to 71%, but the recidivism rates for formerly incarcerated people who found employment shortly after their release is less than 9%. 13Real Clear Politics
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Employing 100 previously incarcerated will increase their lifetime earnings by $55 million. 14“Economic Benefits of Employing Formerly Incarcerated Individuals in Philadelphia,” Philadelphia, PA: Economy League of Greater Philadelphia, 2011.
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Employing 100 previously incarcerated people will increase their income tax contributions by $1.9 million and boost sales tax revenues by $770,000. 15“Economic Benefits of Employing Formerly Incarcerated Individuals in Philadelphia,” Philadelphia, PA: Economy League of Greater Philadelphia, 2011.
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Employing 100 previously incarcerated people will save millions of dollars annually by keeping them out of the criminal justice system. 16“Economic Benefits of Employing Formerly Incarcerated Individuals in Philadelphia,” Philadelphia, PA: Economy League of Greater Philadelphia, 2011.
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A study of “help wanted” advertisements in Virginia found that just 8.23% of employers were open to hiring an applicant with a record. 17Simone Ispa-Landa & Charles E. Loeffler, “Indefinite Punishment and the Criminal Record: Stigma Reports Among Expungement-seekers in Illinois,”54 Criminology 387(2016)
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Formerly incarcerated persons who maintained employment for one year post-release had only a 16% recidivism rate over three years as compared to a 52% recidivism rate for those who did not maintain employment. 18“Safer Foundation Three-Year Recidivism Study, 2008,” Chicago, IL: 2008.
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Hiring managers report that applicants can compensate for criminal records with their personalities and in-person contact with hiring authorities. 19Sarah Lageson, Mike Vuolo, and Chris Uggen, “Legal Ambiguity in Managerial Assessments of Criminal Records,” Law & Social Inquiry,2014.
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85% - 89% of ex-offenders who are re-arrested are unemployed. 20National Institute of Corrections

Do you know?

10 Facts About Prison to Employment Connection

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We collaborate with over 50 Bay Area employers and service providers (PEC Partners).
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PEC Partners come to the prison to conduct job interviews with inmates and provide feedback, support and connections for employment.
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We connect inmates with employers before they are released from prison.
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PEC Partners include Animal Care, Baking, Construction, Culinary Arts, Healthcare, Hospitality, Janitorial & Maintenance, Screen Printing, Restaurant, Technology and Transportation.
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Data collected from our employer assessments report that 99% of the inmates who graduated from the program interview as well as, or better than, job candidates they typically interview.
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85% of the inmates interviewed BETTER than job candidates the employers interview on the street.
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Upon completion of the program, most men experience hope and a new sense of promise for the future.
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PEC is planning a 3-year study to collect data on the relationship between our graduates and recidivism.
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Scott Kernan, Secretary of the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, has observed and is supportive of our program.
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To date, we have successfully graduated 164 men from the Prison to Employment Connection program.

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